• Megan Thee Stallion and Maroon 5 to team up on single ‘Beautiful Mistakes’ next week

    Megan Thee Stallion will team up with Maroon 5 to release the collaborative single ‘Beautiful Mistakes’ on March 3.

    Both artists confirmed the single’s title and release date today (February 22), sharing its cover art to social media. It will be their first time linking up in the recording studio.

    Maroon 5 have dropped hints about a forthcoming release throughout February. Most recently, they posted a photo of a car to Instagram which alluded to a joint single.

    The band also tweeted a possible lyric from the track on February 17, alongside a zoomed-in image of what appears to be the same car.

    Little else is known about the track, with neither artist having shared any audio snippets of it at time of writing.

    Megan Thee Stallion released her first original track of 2021 earlier this month. ‘I’m A King’, which features Dallas rapper Bobby Sessions, is set to appear on the soundtrack for the forthcoming film Coming 2 America.

    To celebrate her 26th birthday on February 15, Megan released ‘Southside Forever Freestyle’, a track in which the rapper declares herself “the hardest in Houston”.

    Prior to her aforementioned releases, Mean Thee Stallion guested on the official remix of Ariana Grande’s track ‘34+35’, alongside Doja Cat. The trio of artists dropped a music video for the remix earlier this month.

    Meanwhile, ’Beautiful Mistakes’ will be Maroon 5’s first release since 2020’s ‘Nobody’s Love’, which featured Popcaan. In January, the band’s frontman, Adam Levine, teamed up with Jason Derulo on the single ‘Lifestyle’.

  • Original Alice Cooper Band Releases New ‘Social Debris’ Single

    Alice Cooper has released a new single, “Social Debris,” in celebration of his 73rd birthday. The song also previews his new album, Detroit Stories, which arrives later this month.

    “A gift to Detroit, to my fans and to myself,” Cooper said in a Twitter video, noting that the song was recorded by the “original” Alice Cooper band, whose surviving members include Neal Smith, Dennis Dunaway and Michael Bruce. (Original lead guitarist Glen Buxton died in 1997.)

    “We always felt like we were social debris, we didn’t fit in,” Cooper noted. “Nobody plays like the original band. They were more dangerous than any other band.”

    From the beginning, Cooper and his band had a tough time figuring out where their distinct sound might fit it. In the late ’60s, with most of America’s musical attention turned to the hot spots on the east and west coasts, there wasn’t much action in the middle – except for Detroit, where Cooper and the band relocated in 1970.

    “Los Angeles had its sound with the Doors, Love and Buffalo Springfield,” Cooper said on his website, where he’s offering a free download of “Social Debris” during its first 24 hours of its release. “San Francisco had the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. New York had the Rascals and the Velvet Underground. But Detroit was the birthplace of angry hard rock. After not fitting in anywhere in the U.S. (musically or image-wise), Detroit was the only place that recognized the Alice Cooper guitar-driven, hard-rock sound and our crazy stage show. Detroit was a haven for the outcasts.”

    It isn’t the first time Cooper has reconvened with the original band members, who have been making occasional appearances on several of the singer’s recent albums. For his 2017 album, Paranormal, Smith, Dunaway and Bruce play on three tracks, along with another Cooper alumni, Steve Hunter, who joined the band in 1973.

    Working once more with longtime producer Bob Ezrin, Cooper is revisiting both his physical roots in Detroit and his enduring relationship with his original band members on the new album, which comes out on Feb. 26.

    “‘Social Debris’ was just the original band writing a song about us, essentially,” Cooper noted in a press release. “And it came out sounding like it belonged into 1971. That’s just the original band – you can’t change that, it’s great.”

    You can listen to the song below.

     

  • Tune-Yards announce new album ‘Sketchy.’, drop fresh single ‘Hold Yourself’

    Tune-Yards have announced the forthcoming release of their fifth studio album, ‘Sketchy’, as well as dropping new single ‘Hold Yourself’.

    On social media, Tune-Yards declared “because the future exists!”, marking the album’s release date as March 26.

    ‘Sketchy.’ will be the California indie outfit’s first new collection in three years, following the release of ‘I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life’ in 2018.

    The album will be released in several vinyl colours, including yellow opaque, translucent blue and standard black. Find the ‘Sketchy.’ tracklist below.

    In a post to the duo’s Twitter today speaking of ‘Hold Yourself’ (January 28), Tune-Yards explained that that though the song was written in 2019, “the themes seem even more relevant today”.

    In a statement, Tune-Yards’ Merrill Garbus elaborated, saying, “This song is about feeling really betrayed by my parents’ generation, and, at the same time, really seeing how we are betraying the future.”

    The new track dropped alongside an impressive video, in which Tune-Yards – made up of Garbus and Nate Brenner – are depicted as psychedelic animations, the trippy story propelling the song’s heavy synth rhythms.

    Watch it below:

    ‘hold yourself’ follows the release of ‘Nowhere, Man’ in September 2020, marking Tune-Yards’ first new material in two years.

    The title of the distorted track references The Beatles‘ 1965 song, ‘Nowhere, Man’, and was accompanied by a stop-motion animated video created by Japhy Riddle and Callie Day.

    In a four-star review of the band’s 2018 album, NME wrote, “Tune-Yards might have taken a deep breath and a step back, allowing their infectious melodies some space, but their breathless skew-whiff eclecticism remains anything but safe.”

    Tune-Yards’ ‘Sketchy.’ tracklist is:

    1. ‘Nowhere, Man’
    2. ‘Make It Right.’
    3. ‘Hypnotized’
    4. ‘Homewrecker’
    5. ‘Silence Pt. 1 (When We Say “We”)’
    6. ‘Silence Pt. 2 (Who is “We”?)’
    7. ‘Hold Yourself.’
    8. ‘Sometime’
    9. ‘Under Your Lip’
    10. ‘My Neighbor’
    11. ‘Be Not Afraid’

  • Listen to Lynks’ addictive new single ‘Everyone’s Hot (And I’m Not)’

    Lynks has shared a new song called ‘Everyone’s Hot (And I’m Not)’ – listen below.

    The track is taken from the NME 100 star‘s upcoming EP ‘Smash Hits Vol. 2’, set to be released on January 27.

    Speaking of the new song, Lynks wrote: “I wrote it on the bus home after a night out where I got pretty violently rejected by a guy I wrongfully assumed was gay. That’s a very specific feeling that I think only queer people will fully understand.

    “I looked around this room of young, hot, straight people and just felt so completely out of place. They were models, I was a librarian. They were classic Coke, I was diet Pepsi. They were hot, I was not. And bam – I sat on the top deck of the 185 bus and the song pretty much wrote itself.”

    Watch the video for ‘Everyone’s Hot (And I’m Not)’ below.

    Speaking to NME for a recent Radar feature, Lynks explained their evolution from a James Blake-influenced act into a self-described ‘masked drag monster’.

    “It was like night and day going from my sad, James Blake-ish thing to my drag, crazy pop-dance thing,” they said. “I was like damn, I guess when you’re performing you’re trying to make people have fun, right? I forgot about that.”

    The NME 100 list – 100 artists set to break through in 2021 – described Lynks’ music as “avant-garde queercore made club-ready,” adding: “Seizing on the tradition of queercore – see Le Tigre, Hunx & His Punx – and setting campy provocation to juddering dance beats, Lynks doesn’t just have razor-sharp wit.

    “Beneath the giddy, kitschy mayhem there’s also emotional heft: take a track like ‘Desperate and Lovely, in Desperate Need of Love’ as a prime example.”

  • Foo Fighters’ New Single ‘Waiting on a War’ Ponders a Dark Future

    Foo Fighters have released the third single from their upcoming album Medicine at Midnight. You can hear “Waiting on a War” below.

    Described in a news release as a “sprawling melodic opus,” “Waiting on a War” was inspired by a conversation frontman Dave Grohl had with his child.

    “Last fall, as I was driving my daughter to school, she turned to me and asked, ‘Daddy, is there going to be a war?'” Grohl recalled. “My heart sank as I realized that she was now living under the same dark cloud that I had felt 40 years ago. I wrote ‘Waiting on a War’ that day.”

    The song concludes more hopefully, the news release adds, with “a patented Foo Fighters rave-up.”

    “Is there more to this than just waiting on a war?” Grohl asked rhetorically. “Because I need more. We all do. This song was written for my daughter Harper, who deserves a future, just as every child does.”

    They’ll perform the new single tonight on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, as Grohl celebrates his birthday. The nine-song Medicine at Midnight is due on Feb. 5 and was co-produced by Greg Kurstin and Foo Fighters.

    The album’s two previous advance tracks were “Shame Shame” and “No Son of Mine.” Grohl is joined by Taylor Hawkins, Nate Mendel, Chris Shiflett, Pat Smear and Rami Jaffee in the band’s current lineup.